Fire warning over petrol storage

Firefighters have issued a warning over storing petrol after a York woman set fire to herself in her own home.
Firefighters have issued a warning over storing petrol after a York woman set fire to herself in her own home.
0
Have your say

Firefighters have issued a warning over storing petrol after a York woman set fire to herself in her own home.

The woman suffered 40 percent burns to her whole body after her clothes caught fire as she was decanting petrol from one container to another in her kitchen.

Two firefighters in breathing apparatus used a hose reel to extinguish the flames and removed the remaining petrol, and the woman was treated by paramedics before being taken to Pinderfields Hospital.

Peter Hudson, a spokesman for North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue, said: “Members of the public should take extreme care when handling and storing petrol and be aware of the risks associated with incorrect use and storage of fuel. In domestic situations fuel containers must not be stored in living accommodation such as kitchens, living rooms and bedrooms or under staircases. Any storage place should be well away from living areas and be secured to protect against the possibility of vandalism or arson.

“Never bring petrol in side your home. If you do smell petrol fumes in a garage or out building ventilate the area and make sure nobody smokes or turns electrical switches on or off. The slightest spark could cause an explosion.”

A spokesman said the fire service want to clarify their position on storing of petrol at domestic properties:

- Fuel should be stored away from the house in either a shed or a garage, well away from people and anywhere where it might be close to a naked flame or other source of ignition.

- If people are planning on storing petrol they should only use containers built specifically for the purpose of carrying fuel. Appropriate containers are available from car accessory stores.

- These are metal containers of 10 litres (approximately two gallons) or plastic containers of five litres (approximately one gallon) and people should have no more than two of each.

- Therefore, people should not store more than 30 litres (approximately six gallons) of fuel in total.